Documentation

Explore data using InfluxQL

To start exploring data with InfluxQL, do the following:

  1. Verify your bucket has a database and retention policy (DBRP) mapping by listing DBRP mappings for your bucket. If not, create a new DBRP mapping.

  2. Configure timestamps in the InfluxQL shell.

  3. (Optional) If you would like to use the data used in the examples below, download the NOAA sample data.

  4. Use the InfluxQL SELECT statement with other key clauses to explore your data.

Download sample data

The example InfluxQL queries in this documentation use publicly available National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data.

To download a subset of NOAA data used in examples, run the script under NOAA water sample data (for example, copy and paste the script into your Data Explorer - Script Editor), and replace “example-org” in the script with the name of your InfluxDB organization.

Let’s get acquainted with this subsample of the data in the h2o_feet measurement:

Output:

Name: h2o_feet

timelevel descriptionlocationwater_level
2019-08-18T00:00:00Zbetween 6 and 9 feetcoyote_creek8.1200000000
2019-08-18T00:00:00Zbelow 3 feetsanta_monica2.0640000000
2019-08-18T00:06:00Zbetween 6 and 9 feetcoyote_creek8.0050000000
2019-08-18T00:06:00Zbelow 3 feetsanta_monica2.1160000000
2019-08-18T00:12:00Zbetween 6 and 9 feetcoyote_creek7.8870000000
2019-08-18T00:12:00Zbelow 3 feetsanta_monica2.0280000000

The data in the h2o_feet measurement occurs at six-minute time intervals. This measurement has one tag key (location) which has two tag values: coyote_creek and santa_monica. The measurement also has two fields: level description stores string field values and water_level stores float field values.

Configure timestamps in the InfluxQL shell

By default, the InfluxQL shell returns timestamps in nanosecond UNIX epoch format by default. To return human-readable RFC3339 timestamps instead of Unix nanosecond timestamps, use the precision helper command ` to configure the timestamp format:

precision rfc3339

The InfluxDB API returns timestamps in RFC3339 format by default. Specify alternative formats with the epoch query string parameter.


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Set your InfluxDB URL

Linux Package Signing Key Rotation

All signed InfluxData Linux packages have been resigned with an updated key. If using Linux, you may need to update your package configuration to continue to download and verify InfluxData software packages.

For more information, see the Linux Package Signing Key Rotation blog post.

InfluxDB Cloud backed by InfluxDB IOx

All InfluxDB Cloud organizations created on or after January 31, 2023 are backed by the new InfluxDB IOx storage engine. Check the right column of your InfluxDB Cloud organization homepage to see which InfluxDB storage engine you’re using.

If powered by IOx, this is the correct documentation.

If powered by TSM, see the TSM-based InfluxDB Cloud documentation.

InfluxDB Cloud backed by InfluxDB TSM

All InfluxDB Cloud organizations created on or after January 31, 2023 are backed by the new InfluxDB IOx storage engine which enables nearly unlimited series cardinality and SQL query support. Check the right column of your InfluxDB Cloud organization homepage to see which InfluxDB storage engine you’re using.

If powered by TSM, this is the correct documentation.

If powered by IOx, see the IOx-based InfluxDB Cloud documentation.

State of the InfluxDB Cloud (IOx) documentation

The new documentation for InfluxDB Cloud backed by InfluxDB IOx is a work in progress. We are adding new information and content almost daily. Thank you for your patience!

If there is specific information you’re looking for, please submit a documentation issue.