API Reference

Warning! This page documents an old version of InfluxDB, which is no longer actively developed. InfluxDB v1.4 is the most recent stable version of InfluxDB.

The InfluxDB API provides a simple way interact with the database. It uses HTTP response codes, HTTP authentication, JWT Tokens, and basic authentication, and responses are returned in JSON.

The following sections assume your InfluxDB instance is running on localhost port 8086 and HTTPS is not enabled. Those settings are configurable.

Endpoints

Endpoint Description
/debug/requests Use /debug/requests/ to track HTTP client requests to the /write and /query endpoints.
/ping Use /ping to check the status of your InfluxDB instance and your version of InfluxDB.
/query Use /query to query data and manage databases, retention policies, and users.
/write Use /write to write data to a pre-existing database.

/debug/requests

Use this endpoint to track HTTP client requests to the /write and /query endpoints. /debug/requests returns the number of writes and queries to InfluxDB per username and IP address.

Definition

curl http://localhost:8086/debug/requests

Query String Parameters

Query String Parameter Optional/Required Definition
seconds=<integer> Optional Sets the duration (in seconds) over which the client collects information. The default duration is ten seconds.

Examples

Example 1: Track requests over a ten-second interval


$ curl http://localhost:8086/debug/requests

{
"user1:123.45.678.91": {"writes":1,"queries":0},
}

The response shows that, over the past ten seconds, the user1 user sent one request to the /write endpoint and no requests to the /query endpoint from the 123.45.678.91 IP address.

Example 2: Track requests over a one-minute interval


$ curl http://localhost:8086/debug/requests?seconds=60

{
"user1:123.45.678.91": {"writes":3,"queries":0},
"user1:000.0.0.0": {"writes":0,"queries":16},
"user2:xx.xx.xxx.xxx": {"writes":4,"queries":0}
}

The response shows that, over the past minute, user1 sent three requests to the /write endpoint from 123.45.678.91, user1 sent 16 requests to the /query endpoint from 000.0.0.0, and user2 sent four requests to the /write endpoint from xx.xx.xxx.xxx.

/ping

The ping endpoint accepts both GET and HEAD HTTP requests. Use this endpoint to check the status of your InfluxDB instance and your version of InfluxDB.

Definition

GET http://localhost:8086/ping
HEAD http://localhost:8086/ping

Example

Extract the version of your InfluxDB instance in the X-Influxdb-Version field of the header:

$ curl -sl -I localhost:8086/ping

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 00:09:52 GMT

Status Codes and Responses

The response body is empty.

HTTP Status Code Description
204 Success! Your InfluxDB instance is up and running.

/query

The /query endpoint accepts GET and POST HTTP requests. Use this endpoint to query data and manage databases, retention policies, and users.

Definition

GET http://localhost:8086/query
POST http://localhost:8086/query

Verb usage

Verb Query Type
GET Use for all queries that start with:

SELECT*

SHOW
POST Use for all queries that start with:

ALTER

CREATE

DELETE

DROP

GRANT

KILL

REVOKE

* The only exceptions are SELECT queries that include an INTO clause. Those SELECT queries require a POST request.

Examples

Example 1: Query data with a SELECT statement


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[["2017-03-01T00:16:18Z",33.1,null,null],["2017-03-01T00:17:18Z",12.4,"12","14"]]}]}]}

The mymeas measurement has two points. The first point has the timestamp 2017-03-01T00:16:18Z, a myfield value of 33.1, and no tag values for the mytag1 and mytag2 tag keys. The second point has the timestamp 2017-03-01T00:17:18Z, a myfield value of 12.4, a mytag1 value of 12, and a mytag2 value of 14.

The same query in InfluxDB’s Command Line Interface (CLI) returns the following table:

name: mymeas
time                  myfield  mytag1  mytag2
----                  -------  ------  ------
2017-03-01T00:16:18Z  33.1
2017-03-01T00:17:18Z  12.4     12      14
Example 2: Query data with a SELECT statement and an INTO clause


$ curl -XPOST 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * INTO "newmeas" FROM "mymeas"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"result","columns":["time","written"],"values":[["1970-01-01T00:00:00Z",2]]}]}]}

SELECT queries that include and INTO clause require a POST request.

The response shows that InfluxDB writes two points to the newmeas measurement. Note that the system uses epoch 0 (1970-01-01T00:00:00Z) as a null timestamp equivalent.

Example 3: Create a database


$ curl -XPOST 'http://localhost:8086/query' --data-urlencode 'q=CREATE DATABASE "mydb"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0}]}

A successful CREATE DATABASE query returns no additional information.

Query String Parameters

Query String Parameter Optional/Required Definition
chunked=[true | <number_of_points>] Optional Returns points in streamed batches instead of in a single response. If set to true, InfluxDB chunks responses by series or by every 10,000 points, whichever occurs first. If set to a specific value, InfluxDB chunks responses by series or by that number of points.*
db=<database_name> Required for database-dependent queries (most SELECT queries and SHOW queries require this parameter). Sets the target database for the query.
epoch=[ns,u,µ,ms,s,m,h] Optional Returns epoch timestamps with the specified precision. By default, InfluxDB returns timestamps in RFC3339 format with nanosecond precision. Both u and µ indicate microseconds.
p=<password> Optional if you haven’t enabled authentication. Required if you’ve enabled authentication.** Sets the password for authentication if you’ve enabled authentication. Use with the query string parameter u.
pretty=true Optional Enables pretty-printed JSON output. While this is useful for debugging it is not recommended for production use as it consumes unnecessary network bandwidth.
u=<username> Optional if you haven’t enabled authentication. Required if you’ve enabled authentication.* Sets the username for authentication if you’ve enabled authentication. The user must have read access to the database. Use with the query string parameter p.

* InfluxDB does not truncate the number of rows returned for requests without the chunked parameter. That behavior is configurable; see the max-row-limit configuration option for more information.

** The HTTP API also supports basic authentication. Use basic authentication if you’ve enabled authentication and aren’t using the query string parameters u and p. See below for an example of basic authentication.

Examples

Example 1: Query data with a SELECT statement and return pretty-printed JSON


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb&pretty=true' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas"'

{
    "results": [
        {
            "statement_id": 0,
            "series": [
                {
                    "name": "mymeas",
                    "columns": [
                        "time",
                        "myfield",
                        "mytag1",
                        "mytag2"
                    ],
                    "values": [
                        [
                            "2017-03-01T00:16:18Z",
                            33.1,
                            null,
                            null
                        ],
                        [
                            "2017-03-01T00:17:18Z",
                            12.4,
                            "12",
                            "14"
                        ]
                    ]
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}
Example 2: Query data with a SELECT statement and return second precision epoch timestamps


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb&epoch=s' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[[1488327378,33.1,null,null],[1488327438,12.4,"12","14"]]}]}]}
Example 3: Create a database using HTTP authentication


Valid credentials:

$ curl -XPOST 'http://localhost:8086/query?u=myusername&p=mypassword' --data-urlencode 'q=CREATE DATABASE "mydb"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0}]}

A successful CREATE DATABASE query returns no additional information.

Invalid credentials:

$ curl -XPOST 'http://localhost:8086/query?u=myusername&p=notmypassword' --data-urlencode 'q=CREATE DATABASE "mydb"'

{"error":"authorization failed"}
Example 4: Create a database using basic authentication


Valid credentials:

$ curl -XPOST -u myusername:mypassword 'http://localhost:8086/query' --data-urlencode 'q=CREATE DATABASE "mydb"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0}]}

A successful CREATE DATABASE query returns no additional information.

Invalid credentials:

$ curl -XPOST -u myusername:notmypassword 'http://localhost:8086/query' --data-urlencode 'q=CREATE DATABASE "mydb"'

{"error":"authorization failed"}

Request Body

--data-urlencode "q=<InfluxQL query>"

All queries must be URL encoded and follow InfluxQL syntax. Our example shows the --data-urlencode parameter from curl, which we use in all examples on this page.

Options

Request Multiple Queries


Delimit multiple queries with a semicolon ;.

Submit Queries from a File


The API supports submitting queries from a file using a multipart POST request. The queries in the file must be separated a semicolon (;).

Syntax:

curl -F "q=@<path_to_file>" -F "async=true" http://localhost:8086/query
Request Query Results in CSV format


Syntax:

curl -H "Accept: application/csv" -G 'http://localhost:8086/query [...]

Note that when the request includes -H "Accept: application/csv", the system returns timestamps in epoch format, not RFC3339 format.

Bind Parameters


The API supports binding parameters to particular field values or tag values in the WHERE clause. Use the syntax $<placeholder_key> as a placeholder in the query, and URL encode the map of placeholder keys to placeholder values in the request body:

Query syntax:

--data-urlencode 'q= SELECT [...] WHERE [ <field_key> | <tag_key> ] = $<placeholder_key>'

Map syntax:

--data-urlencode 'params={"<placeholder_key>":[ <placeholder_float_field_value> | <placeholder_integer_field_value> | "<placeholder_string_field_value>" | <placeholder_boolean_field_value> | "<placeholder_tag_value>" ]}'

Delimit multiple placeholder key-value pairs with comma ,.

Examples

Example 1: Send multiple queries


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb&epoch=s' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas";SELECT mean("myfield") FROM "mymeas"'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[[1488327378,33.1,null,null],[1488327438,12.4,"12","14"]]}]},{"statement_id":1,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","mean"],"values":[[0,22.75]]}]}]}

The request includes two queries: SELECT * FROM "mymeas" and SELECT mean("myfield") FROM "mymeas"'. In the results, the system assigns a statement identifier to each query return. The first query’s result has a statement_id of 0 and the second query’s result has a statement_id of 1.

Example 2: Request query results in CSV format


$ curl -H "Accept: application/csv" -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas"'

name,tags,time,myfield,mytag1,mytag2
mymeas,,1488327378000000000,33.1,mytag1,mytag2
mymeas,,1488327438000000000,12.4,12,14

The first point has no tag values for the mytag1 and mytag2 tag keys.

Example 3: Submit queries from a file


$ curl -F "q=@queries.txt" -F "async=true" 'http://localhost:8086/query'

A sample of the queries in queries.txt:

CREATE DATABASE mydb;
CREATE RETENTION POLICY four_weeks ON mydb DURATION 4w REPLICATION 1;
Example 4: Bind a parameter in the WHERE clause to specific tag value


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas" WHERE "mytag1" = $tag_value' --data-urlencode 'params={"tag_value":"12"}'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[["2017-03-01T00:17:18Z",12.4,"12","14"]]}]}]}

The request maps $tag_value to 12. InfluxDB stores tag values as strings they and must be double quoted in the request.

Example 5: Bind a parameter in the WHERE clause to a numerical field value


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas" WHERE "myfield" > $field_value' --data-urlencode 'params={"field_value":30}'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[["2017-03-01T00:16:18Z",33.1,null,null]]}]}]}

The request maps $field_value to 30. The value 30 does not require double quotes because myfield stores numerical field values.

Example 6: Bind two parameters in the WHERE clause to a specific tag value and numerical field value


$ curl -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas" WHERE "mytag1" = $tag_value AND  "myfield" < $field_value' --data-urlencode 'params={"tag_value":"12","field_value":30}'

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[["2017-03-01T00:17:18Z",12.4,"12","14"]]}]}]}

The request maps $tag_value to 12 and $field_value to 30.

Status codes and responses

Responses are returned in JSON. Include the query string parameter pretty=true to enable pretty-print JSON.

Summary Table

HTTP status code Description
200 OK Success! The returned JSON offers further information.
400 Bad Request Unacceptable request. Can occur with a syntactically incorrect query. The returned JSON offers further information.
401 Unauthorized Unacceptable request. Can occur with invalid authentication credentials.

Examples

Example 1: A successful request that returns data


$ curl -i -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas"'

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Connection: close
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 19:22:54 GMT
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"series":[{"name":"mymeas","columns":["time","myfield","mytag1","mytag2"],"values":[["2017-03-01T00:16:18Z",33.1,null,null],["2017-03-01T00:17:18Z",12.4,"12","14"]]}]}]}
Example 2: A successful request that returns an error


$ curl -i -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb1' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT * FROM "mymeas"'

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Connection: close
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 19:23:48 GMT
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

{"results":[{"statement_id":0,"error":"database not found: mydb1"}]}
Example 3: An incorrectly formatted query


$ curl -i -G 'http://localhost:8086/query?db=mydb' --data-urlencode 'q=SELECT *'

HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 19:24:25 GMT
Content-Length: 76

{"error":"error parsing query: found EOF, expected FROM at line 1, char 9"}
Example 4: Query data with invalid authentication credentials


$ curl -i  -XPOST 'http://localhost:8086/query?u=myusername&p=notmypassword' --data-urlencode 'q=CREATE DATABASE "mydb"'

HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
Www-Authenticate: Basic realm="InfluxDB"
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 19:11:26 GMT
Content-Length: 33

{"error":"authorization failed"}

/write

The /write endpoint accepts POST HTTP requests. Use this endpoint to write data to a pre-existing database.

Definition

POST http://localhost:8086/write

Query String Parameters

Query String Parameter Optional/Required Description
consistency=[any,one,quorum,all] Optional, available with InfluxEnterprise clusters only. Sets the write consistency for the point. InfluxDB assumes that the write consistency is one if you do not specify consistency. See the InfluxEnterprise documentation for detailed descriptions of each consistency option.
db=<database> Required Sets the target database for the write.
p=<password> Optional if you haven’t enabled authentication. Required if you’ve enabled authentication.* Sets the password for authentication if you’ve enabled authentication. Use with the query string parameter u.
precision=[ns,u,ms,s,m,h] Optional Sets the precision for the supplied Unix time values. InfluxDB assumes that timestamps are in nanoseconds if you do not specify precision.**
rp=<retention_policy_name> Optional Sets the target retention policy for the write. InfluxDB writes to the DEFAULT retention policy if you do not specify a retention policy.
u=<username> Optional if you haven’t enabled authentication. Required if you’ve enabled authentication.* Sets the username for authentication if you’ve enabled authentication. The user must have write access to the database. Use with the query string parameter p.

* The HTTP API also supports basic authentication. Use basic authentication if you’ve enabled authentication and aren’t using the query string parameters u and p. See below for an example of basic authentication.

** We recommend using the least precise precision possible as this can result in significant improvements in compression.

Examples

Example 1: Write a point to the database mydb with a timestamp in seconds


$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb&precision=s" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=90 1463683075'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 17:33:23 GMT
Example 2: Write a point to the database mydb and the retention policy myrp


$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb&rp=myrp" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=90'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 17:34:31 GMT
Example 3: Write a point to the database mydb using HTTP authentication


Valid credentials:

$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb&u=myusername&p=mypassword" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=91'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 17:34:56 GMT

Invalid credentials:

$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb&u=myusername&p=notmypassword" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=91'

HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
Www-Authenticate: Basic realm="InfluxDB"
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 17:40:30 GMT
Content-Length: 33

{"error":"authorization failed"}
Example 4: Write a point to the database mydb using basic authentication


Valid credentials:

$ curl -i -XPOST -u myusername:mypassword "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=91'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 17:36:40 GMT

Invalid credentials:

$ curl -i -XPOST -u myusername:notmypassword "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=91'

HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
Www-Authenticate: Basic realm="InfluxDB"
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 17:46:40 GMT
Content-Length: 33

{"error":"authorization failed"}

Request Body

--data-binary '<Data in Line Protocol format>'

All data must be binary encoded and in the Line Protocol format. Our example shows the --data-binary parameter from curl, which we will use in all examples on this page. Using any encoding method other than --data-binary will likely lead to issues; -d, --data-urlencode, and --data-ascii may strip out newlines or introduce new, unintended formatting.

Options:

  • Write several points to the database with one request by separating each point by a new line.
  • Write points from a file with the @ flag. The file should contain a batch of points in the Line Protocol format. Individual points must be on their own line and separated by newline characters (\n). Files containing carriage returns will cause parser errors.

    We recommend writing points in batches of 5,000 to 10,000 points. Smaller batches, and more HTTP requests, will result in sub-optimal performance.

Examples

Example 1: Write a point to the database mydb with a nanosecond timestamp


$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=90 1463683075000000000'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 18:02:57 GMT
Example 2: Write a point to the database mydb with the local server’s nanosecond timestamp


$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=90'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 18:03:44 GMT
Example 3: Write several points to the database mydb by separating points with a new line


$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb" --data-binary 'mymeas,mytag=3 myfield=89
mymeas,mytag=2 myfield=34 1463689152000000000'

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 18:04:02 GMT
Example 4: Write several points to the database mydb from the file data.txt


$ curl -i -XPOST "http://localhost:8086/write?db=mydb" --data-binary @data.txt

HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Content-Type: application/json
Request-Id: [...]
X-Influxdb-Version: 1.3.x
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2017 18:08:11 GMT

A sample of the data in data.txt:

mymeas,mytag1=1 value=21 1463689680000000000
mymeas,mytag1=1 value=34 1463689690000000000
mymeas,mytag2=8 value=78 1463689700000000000
mymeas,mytag3=9 value=89 1463689710000000000

Status codes and responses

In general, status codes of the form 2xx indicate success, 4xx indicate that InfluxDB could not understand the request, and 5xx indicate that the system is overloaded or significantly impaired. Errors are returned in JSON.

Summary Table

HTTP status code Description
204 No Content Success!
400 Bad Request Unacceptable request. Can occur with a Line Protocol syntax error or if a user attempts to write values to a field that previously accepted a different value type. The returned JSON offers further information.
401 Unauthorized Unacceptable request. Can occur with invalid authentication credentials.
404 Not Found Unacceptable request. Can occur if a user attempts to write to a database that does not exist. The returned JSON offers further information.
500 Internal Server Error The system is overloaded or significantly impaired. Can occur if a user attempts to write to a retention policy that does not exist. The returned JSON offers further information.

Examples

Example 1: A successful write


HTTP/1.1 204 No Content
Example 2: Write a point with an incorrect timestamp


HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request
[...]
{"error":"unable to parse 'mymeas,mytag=1 myfield=91 abc123': bad timestamp"}
Example 3: Write an integer to a field that previously accepted a float


HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request
[...]
{"error":"field type conflict: input field \"myfield\" on measurement \"mymeas\" is type int64, already exists as type float"}
Example 4: Write a point with invalid authentication credentials


HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized
[...]
{"error":"authorization failed"}
Example 5: Write a point to a database that doesn’t exist


HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found
[...]
{"error":"database not found: \"mydb1\""}
Example 6: Write a point to a retention policy that doesn’t exist


HTTP/1.1 500 Internal Server Error
[...]
{"error":"retention policy not found: myrp"}